Tuesday, 21 November 2017

An Italian Wars Weekend, in Scotland.

Last weekend, my turn to stage a game for The League of Gentleman Wargamers came about. I chose to do the Italian Wars as a single 'Kingmaker style' campaign game. 

The bulk of the figures were provided by Steve Rimmer and myself with significant contingents provided by Chris Henry, Angus Konstam, Dale Smith and other members of the group. It was a good job they were. On Sunday I estimated there were over 3,500 figures in play, fighting on every table. 

The massed buildings, representing the 44 towns and cities, were brought by several players, with Peter Nicholson and Charles S. Grant providing most (I think); Steve Rimmer provided most of the walled cities. Before the game, not having enough real estate was my chief worry - I don't know where players find the room to store all this stuff - Charles S., alone, brought over 40 buildings and Fort St. Elmo!

Even with the rugged hills rising as a backdrop behind the small town of Kirriemuir in Angus, an icy Saturday November morning in Scotland didn't make it feel much like being in Rome, Florence or Venice (it was positively balmy 15C in Rome last Saturday). However, inside the hired hall it looked a little more like it.

The tables, depicting Italy from  Naples to the Alps. Angus K, pictured top is stood in front of Venice.
Italy, from Naples to the Alps, was set up on five 6' deep tables. The first three (looking north, as per the photograph above) were 12' wide and represented the interlinking localities of Naples, Rome and Florence. These tables were all split by the the spine of the Apennines, all classed as impassable rugged mountains except at three passes. Being impassable they didn't have to be as wide as they should be, allowing more space to manoeuvre troops on the 'coastal plains'. Naples is just out of shot in the lower left corner, the big church is Rome and the big city on the next table is Florence.

The next two tables, looking north, are the 16' wide table with (left to right) Genoa, Modena and Bologna on it; and lastly, the table with The French Alpine passes, Milan, Ferrara, and Venice - this last table was the biggest at 20' wide. These two tables were split by the river Po which was, by the nature of the gap, remarkably straight edged but worked quite well.

All in all,less the space taken by the mountains, that gave a remarkable 432 square feet of potential battlefield for the 14 players to wade about in.

The players were (and I'll only name each once):


Steve Rimmer (Milan) on the left and Angus Konstam (Doge of Venice) on the right. 

The walls of Milan are in the distance and the place in the sunlight is Ferrara (actually sited on the wrong side of the Po for game play purposes). 

Venice, pictured later, was represented by fort St. Elmo and is just out of shot behind the tank - which we made up rules for and featured as part of a Venetian naval invasion of Southern Italy.
In the mid-blue collar, Bill Gilchrist (King of France).

Bill's knowledge of Pike and Shotte rules (on which the rules for the game were based) helped greatly over the weekend - he was a very welcome 'rules medic' when I was occupied elsewhere.
Standing left to right, Graham Hill (Duke of Modena), Dale Smith (Seigniory of Florence), Kieron Potts (Venice's No2), Kevin Calder (Doge of Genoa). 

The three walled cities, left to right are Bologna, Modena and Genoa.
On the left, Chris Henry (Spain's representative of the King, The Grand Captain) asks Peter Nicholson (The Pope) to leave him alone but the Pope will have none of it. Spain and the Papal State will battle it out for the entire weekend and Spain will get clobbered, having only one city (Naples) and two units between its two players at the end of day 1: With a little umpire aid they recovered slightly on Sunday - I gave the the Machiavelli card which allowed recruitment at 50% cost.
On the left Peter McCarrol (France's No2) who starts the game in the Papal State east of the Apennines fights it out with Colin Jacks (Spain's No2).
Chalie Grant (The Papal State's No2) shows his thoughts on not getting another duplicity card.
Charles S. Grant (The Duke of Ferrara). Not quite master of all he surveys but, definitely looking like a man of ambition.
On the right, in burgundy, Peter Jackson (The Duke of Bologna).

The format for the game was as follows. At the start of each session, each player declared their support for Hapsburg or Valois - because the rules were a U-go-I-go mechanic based on Warlord's Pike and Shot - and this determined who was allied to whom for the session. In all, if memory serves, I think the whole game was divided into 6 playing sessions.

To this mix I added events cards that were either simply handed out to each player, or obtained by rolling a 5 or 6, at various points in the day. These cards included such things as pontoon trains to aid the crossing of rivers, duplicity cards that enabled players to change sides mid session, spies, the appearance of Savonarola, ambushes, blackmail, earthworks and various other things to stoke the pot. All cards could be played or traded at any time. All cards were always positive for the player who used them and generally bad for everyone else. 

The victory conditions were simple. By building a fiefdom by capturing towns for themselves, the players could levy taxes in 'gold' (poker chips). Gold could be used for various things (including buying new troops) and the player with most at the end of the weekend would be declared the winner. 

On Saturday we started playing just before 10 a.m. and finished at 6 p.m., on Sunday we started at the same time and finished at 3 p.m. 

Here are some shots taken of the action and more can be found on Bill Gilchrist's blog here.












As it turned out, the winner, and by some margin was the Doge of Venice (Angus). He had 375 gold. Bring up the rear, also by some margin was the Grand Captain (Chris) had least with 50 gold. 

I'd like to thank everyone who contributed to the game and I hope everyone enjoyed their weekend. 

I can relax now, for a year or two. Scheduled LOGW games for the next couple of years will be organised by others. The next one, in the Spring, will be themed as A Very British Civil War weekend.





Sunday, 5 November 2017

A Generic Bridging Train & Pontoon Bridge (plus a few other bits)

Since I started wargaming I've always wanted to have a bridging train. In the past I've made half-hearted attempts with a few pontoons with bridging sections but, because of the cost of white metal wagons and the fact that an actual train will rarely get used (except as an interesting column of military wagons), I haven't bothered with anything more substantial. 


Then War Bases wagons and carts came along. War Bases don't actually make a pontoon wagon (yet) but they do produce a wagon that can be easily and cheaply converted. All I did was use the deck with a few extra pieces of balsa wood as planks and add a couple of trestles (made using off cuts from the MDF kit frame) for the home made balsa wood pontoon. Normally I'd stick the pontoon to the wagon, but in this case I've left them separate so that they can be used to represent a pontoon bridge under construction. 

The teams used for the pontoon wagons are also by War Bases.


I made one pontoon wagon up a while ago. Now I've gone the whole hog and produced another which along with War Bases Engineers Cart with cast resin load will make up my bridging train.


In the near future I intend to tackle some new wide river sections. To that end, I've purchased a heap of MDF sheet, and I have made up the first piece - the pontoon bridge piece. I made it using a 2mm MDF base with foam board banks. The bridge is balsa wood planking with lolly pop stick supports; the end poles are barbecue skewers.

Until I make the rest of the river this piece cannot be finished because I want it to blend in seamlessly. A post on this will follow.


The bridge is constructed in three pieces: The ramps on the river banks (as a fixed river section piece with bridge heads) that can be slotted into the river system as desired and two two pontoon bridging spans with planking afixed. Along with the two pontoons from the wagons, this should be enough to represent the bridge in varying stages of completion. I think this will work rather well. I can feel a few bridging scenarios in the offing!

Lastly, here are two other carts by War Bases. The first is a turnip cart with a load of hay made from P.V.A. soaked teddy bear fur, the second is a water cart

I can't recommend these wagons and carts enough, the quality is excellent. The turnip and peasant carts are £4 each. Having resin components, the water and engineer's cart are £5 and £7 respectively. War Bases teams are £4 per pair of cast metal horses. 



I still have two more War Bases carts to make up: Peasant cart 2 and Peasant cart 3. I just love 'em!


Friday, 3 November 2017

Help needed with a commemorative medal.

Back in 2009, whilst Mr. Putin was readying things for the bicentenary of the Battle of Borodino in 2012, I visited the battlefield. Whilst there I managed to pick up a commemorative medal as a souvenir. 


As far as I could gather, from one of the Babushkas in the museum shop, this Bagration / Borodino medal was cast using bronze from a cannon that was fired on the field of Borodino back in 1812, though I think quite a bit was was lost in translation, and it all sounded rather dodgy to me at the time. I can't remember how much the medal was (my brother-in-law took care of everything for the whole Russia trip) but I have a feeling it was quite pricey.


Unfortunately, I can't find anything about this particular medal anywhere, which leads me to believe it's either quite rare or quite worthless. If any of this blog's readers can help me out with the following queries, I'd appreciate it. 

1. Was it actually cast from the metal of a gun used in the battle? 
2. What is the literal translation of the writing / legend?
3. Does it have anything other than a sentimental souvenir value?


It's quite thick and quite heavy. I've placed a British penny, EU two cent piece and USA one cent piece next to the medal for scale. I've also taken a shot of the presentation case it came in, which appears to be wood and leather (possibly leather effect plastic).


Thanks for looking.

Some pics of Zorndorf from Fiasco 2017


Firstly, I'd like to thank Graham for driving the game to the show, and I'd like to thank Kev C. and Bob (L&LS) for volunteering on the day to fight the battle. 

I'd also like to say a special thank you to Martin from War Bases who kindly donated some of his excellent wagon kits for the game. I'll do a post on these after I do the others I picked up at Fiasco.

One benefit of taking a big game to a wargame show is the ability take shots of the whole table from either end (before the punters turn up in force); this is something I can't usually do in my wargame room. The table turned out to be 14' 6" x 6', almost exactly the dimensions of my own table.

Like the show, the game went quiet after lunch and became something of a static display but, it seemed to attract quite a lot of interest and provided some eye candy.


From behind the Russian right. Quartschen should be off table but it serves well to represent the impassable terrain (including the Metzel) to be found in this sector whilst adding height and interest to a generally flat table.
From behind the Russian left. Here, Demiku's cavalry protects the flank of Browne's Observation Corps.

From behind the Prussian right. Scorlemer's cavalry protects the flank of Dohna's infantry.

From behind the Prussian left. Here the cavalry of Sydlitz, Marschall and Malachowski  stands ready to support the attack of Manteuffel and Kanitz.

Following a heavy bombardment (60 dice), the infantry of Manteuffel and Kanitz attack.

On the Prussian right a cavalry battle seems inevitable.

Things started to get historically messy in the Quartschen sector. Three of the Martin's War Bases MDF wagons can be seen in this shot, including one converted into a pontoon wagon - I've just finished making the second - a 'turnip' cart (with home made teddy bear fur 'hay' load), and his wonderful engineers cart with cast resin load. Other carts are by Front Rank, showing just how good the WB ones are and how well they fit in with other commercially available metal stuff.

Dohna and Browne began to contest the Stein Busch whilst the cavalry stood at the ready. You might notice, looking at the field pattern compared to earlier shots, that the fields were a movable feast - something that raised the odd eyebrow on the day. 

Even the pesky Cossacks got in on the act.
Thanks to everyone who dropped by to say hi and ask questions. See you next year.

Wednesday, 25 October 2017

FIASCO 2017 - Zorndorf hits the road again

Those who follow this blog will know that my expanded SYW collection is largely down to committing to doing a demo game of Zorndorf 1758 at Triples in 2014. Game aside, that show did not go well (the worst experience I've ever had at a wargame show) and the thought of doing Zorndorf again at another show has been a hurdle that I've not been able to jump - even though I had originally planned to 'tour' the game for a year or so. 

However, wounds heal and I've decided that my Zorndorf game will be at Fiasco 2017 this Sunday. 

Here are some shots of the game I took today prior to packing it all up for the show. The playing space is 14 x 6; there are in excess of 1500 figures (including some new wagons from War Bases - see next post).

Fiasco details



Anyone wishing to join in this game for a few turns (or the day) need only ask. There are only three Lads doing the game this weekend, so a few more people to actually play the game would be welcome. As with the Cerignola game last month, places are limited and the game is not child friendly (sorry about the latter but, it's not a 'true participation game' - we leave that for others). 



The rules will be Warlord's Black Powder with some fairly simple house amendments. If you want to play, my address is in the side bar - book a place.


If you are passing, drop by to say hi.

Tuesday, 10 October 2017

Derby Worlds - Thanks to everyone who stopped by for a chat.

The game, less hills and table coverings packed up and ready to go.
I counted them all out, and I counted them all back. All of the Italian Wars figures and terrain pieces are back in their cabinets and I'm glad to report that they all made the trip to Derby Worlds and back safely.

Steve R., who came all the way from Perth (Scotland) to help out, explains the game  to one of his (many) lady friends.
I'd just like to say thank you, on behalf of the Ilkley Lads, to everyone who stopped by the Cerignola game. We had a thoroughly enjoyable time at the show (despite the somewhat cramped conditions imposed by the smaller new venue) and everyone seemed extremely chatty and friendly this year - I can't remember a game or set up that generated as much interest or as many questions.


(The) Don, dice in hand, who came up from London to help with the game on Saturday, pictured just after d'Ars cavalry crashed into the earthwork following the powder explosion (foreground).

The games, one played on each day, were both played to a satisfactory conclusion: the results came as a complete shocker: the French won both! The first day's result was down to a powder explosion happening on the first turn of the game when the gun in front of d'Ars exploded and d'Ars' cavalry successfully charged the ditch in the French phase of the same turn - it was a case of 'a perfect storm'. 


A good shot of the set up early in the game on Sunday. In the foreground d'Alegre's cavalry can be seen arriving on the battlefield as d'Ars goes into the attack.
The second game was contested rather more closely, with both sides tiring, but the Spanish were eventually forced to throw in the towel when the Landsknechts collapsed. As a re-fight of Cerignola it wasn't that historical, partly due to the downgraded definition of the ditch and earthwork, but as a game it was highly entertaining. 


Steve R. and Graham H. (the designated driver - thanks, Graham) overseeing the French attack on the second day of the show. This shot shows the proximity of the nearby tables - breath in.
Anyone wishing a for a more historical scenario result should count the earthwork as a strong fortification that affords a +2 morale save bonus and a +2 melee result bonus for defending a fortification. However, for a game that keeps the French player interested I would keep everything as it is here.


Bad War, Swiss and Landsknechts go at it hammer and tongs. This shot is from Saturday's  action when the Swiss  suffered heavily at the earthwork.





Tuesday, 3 October 2017

Derby Worlds - Cerignola 1503

This weekend The Ilkley Lads will present Cerignola 1503 as a demonstration game. On the Derby Worlds site it says that this will be a participation game but, this is a misprint, it's actually demo game. However, if one or two people want to pitch in for a few moves to try the rules, or simply to roll a dice or two, we are normally happy to oblige - with one caveat, due to the nature of the game and the figure collection is not really suitable for children (sorry).


As with all games put on by The Ilkley Lads, we will not have handouts. We will have an account of the battle and the OOB that can be read at table-side and blog address slips to so that people can find the same material published here if they want to use it in the future. 

We have put on a Cerignola game at a show before and much of the material that follows is a rehash of previous posts. However, this time we will use Pike and Shotte rules by Warlord to re-fight the battle. Consequently, the order of battle and scenario have been tailored to suit P&S and new figures have allowed more and bigger units to be used.


The Battle of Cerignola 1503


A short historical background.


The Battle set up on an 8' x 6' table with a 2' dogleg to allow d’Alégre to be deployed coming up into position. The dark green baize is, for game purposes, 'Out of Bounds'. The letters relate to the OOB below.

In 1500 Louis XII determined that he would re-conquer the Kingdom of Naples for France. In June 1501 his army, under the command of Louis d’Armagnac Duc de Nemours, began to mass in Rome in readiness for the invasion. King Federigo of Naples anxiously watched the French preparations and frantically tried to raise an army of defence; his one consolation was that several thousand Spanish troops under the command of his friend Gonsalvo de Cordoba had crossed the Straits of Messina to land in the south of his Kingdom. It seemed as though Federigo’s uncle, King Ferdinand of Spain, was coming to his rescue.



Spanish cavalry. These are under the direct control of the Spanish C-in- C, Gonsalvo de Cordoba.

Just before the French army departed south Pope Alexander VI disclosed the secret Treaty of Granada signed on 11th November 1500. By the provisions of the treaty King Federigo would be forced to abdicate and his kingdom would be divided. King Louis XII of France would become King of Naples and take control of Naples, Terra di Lavoro and Abruzzi. King Ferdinand of Spain would take the title Duke of Calabria and control of Calabria and Apulia. Federigo had been stitched up by his own family.


Spanish colunelas on the right under Pizarro de Paredes.

By the spring of 1502 it was all over for the old regime. The Kingdom had been occupied and divided by the armies of France and Spain. But not everything was settled. Two important regions in the Kingdom, Capitanata and Basilicata, were not mentioned in the treaty and both France and Spain laid claim to them. By the summer of 1502 what had started as angry skirmishes between French and Spanish outposts in the contested provinces had escalated into open hostilities.

The Spanish army was heavily outnumbered by the French. Fearing that he would be overrun Gonsalvo ordered most of his troops to concentrate at, and fortify, the port of Barletta on the coast of Apulia. There he would await reinforcements and events. Nemours moved the French army to blockade Barletta. Gonsalvo wisely refused to give battle and Nemours secured most of the rest of Apulia for France.


Gonsalvo's much prized Landsknechts under Fabricio Zamudio. So popular were they that, the common Spanish soldiery voluntarily gave up rations to make them feel more welcome.

Gonsalvo’s situation in Apulia began to change from the autumn of 1502. Nemours divided his army and sent a strong force to occupy Calabria; Nemours lifted the blockade of Barletta to put his army into winter quarters; Gonsalvo was reinforced - including a contingent of seven regiments of veteran landsknecht pikemen; in late February 1503, Gonsalvo led a sortie out of Barletta and took the town of Ruvo, capturing the French captain La Palisse, 150 gendarmes and 800 infantry. The scales were in balance (both sides were now equal in number with about 8,000 men each). Gonsalvo decided that the time had come to seek a battle with Nemours. On 27th April 1503 Gonsalvo marched his army out of Barletta and Nemours moved to confront him. 


Spanish colunelas on the left under Diego de Paredes.

The Spanish army arrived at the hill top town of Cerignola on 28th April. It was a swelteringly hot day but, rather than rest his men after their hard and dusty march, he set them to deepening and widening a wet ditch at the foot of Cerignola’s vine clad slopes. The spoil, held together with stakes and vines grubbed up from the hill side above, were piled into a low rampart. This rampart, lined end to end with thousands of arquebusier (early musketeers) would decide the battle to come. 

The French were marching to Cerignola, strung out along the road, advancing without reconnaissance, and harassed by Spanish light cavalry. It was very late in the day when they finally arrived before Cerignola. On seeing the Spanish army below the town the French held a council of war to determine their next move.


Italian infantry and cavaly under Fabricio Colonna holding the extreme Spanish left.


The Duc de Nemours favoured waiting until morning before attacking. This would allow his artillery (struggling up the road some distance to the rear) to come up, and his tired infantry (some of whom had suffered heat stroke) to rest after their long, hot march. Many of Nemours’ captains disagreed. Even though the army had not yet fully come up Yves d’Alégre, amongst others, urged an immediate attack. Surely, they said, one violent attack with a combination of the Swiss and Gendarmes that were present would decide the battle – as they always had – and afterwards they could all sleep, victorious, in comfortable beds in the town. The council became argumentative and Nemours was forced to bow to his officer’s wishes. No one in the French army had seen the deepened ditch and rampart.
 

French Gendarmes and light cavalry under Louis d'Ars deployed on the French right.

The French hastily formed up in echelon from the right. Nemours ordered the trumpets to sound the attack. The French line moved forward under fire from Spanish arquebusier and artillery. A light wind blew the powder smoke towards the French and that, with the clouds of dust kicked up by the horse’s hooves, blinded them to the danger of the ditch until they were upon it. The French were brought to an abrupt halt at the edge of the unexpected obstacle and subjected to a murderous fire. It was several minutes before the French crossed the ditch and came to close quarters with its defenders on the other side. 

In the French right centre, massed Swiss pike under Tambien Chandieu.

Suddenly, there was a moment of panic in the Spanish ranks as a powder magazine blew up inside the entrenchment. Gonsalvo, seeing his troops flinch, rode up in person to restore their courage. All along the ditch the French tried to break through the Spaniard’s defensive line. Attempt after attempt was made in vain. Crashing volleys of Spanish arquebus fire poured into them and soon the French were knee deep in mud, and the blood of their piling dead.

Gascon crossbow armed infantry in the centre right under Gespard de Coligny. In the distance, Louis d'Armagnac the Duke of Namours.
As the sun began to set the Duc de Nemours, riding along the line shouting words of encouragement to his men, was shot by an anonymous arquebusier. Then Chandieu crossed the ditch in an attempt to find a gap. He was immediately identified by his white plumes and fell, armour sieved, in a hail of shot. Darkness fell and the leaderless French began to falter.

Gonsalvo ordered a general advance. His infantry leaped across their breastwork crying out “Castile, Aragon, Santiago!” His cavalry crossed the ditch and wheeled in on the French flanks. The French broke. The slaughter was terrible. Only the darkness saved them from being completely massacred. The battle had lasted little more than an hour but, in that time, more than 4000 French soldiers had been slain. The Spanish had lost less than 100 men. 

For the first time in history, an army comprising the best troops in Europe had been defeated by a thin line of ragged soldiers wielding short lengths of iron tube loaded with gun powder and lead pellets. Warfare was changing……….

Coming up, Yves d’Alégre's cavalry. Somewhere on the road behind these troops the French artillery is struggling to reach the field before it's all over.


Spanish OOB

A. Gonsalvo de Cordoba (C-in-C) - Rating 10, Decisive.

  • 1 unit of Spanish knights and other heavy cavalry [16 figures].
  • 1 unit of Spanish Genitors  [16 figures].
B. Fabricio Colonna - Rating 7, Aggressive.
  • 2 units of Italian Lance Spezzate [16 figures each].
  • 1 unit of Italian arquebus [24 figures].
  • 1 unit of Italian infantry [24 figures].
C. Diego de Parades - Rating 8.
  • 2 large units of Spanish colunela [46 figures each].
  • 2 light guns [1 gun model plus crew each].
D. Fabricio Zamudio - Rating 7 Aggressive.
  • 3 units of Landsknecht pike [36 figures each].
  • 1 small unit of Landsknecht shot [12 figures].

E. Pizarro de Parades - Rating 8.
  • 2 units of Spanish colunela [46 figures each].
  • 1 unit of Italian shot [24 figures].
  • 2 light guns [1 gun model plus crew each].
Total - 376 Infantry; 64 Cavalry. 4 Guns.


French OOB

A. Louis de Armagnac the Duke of Nemours [C-in-C] - Rating 8, Timid.

B. Louis d'Ars Rating 7, Rash.
  • 3 units of French Gendarmes [16 figures each].
  • 2 units of mounted crossbowmen [16 figures each].
C. Tambien Chandieu - Rating 8, Agressive.
  • 3 very large units of Swiss pike [72 figures each].
  • 1 unit of Swiss shot [20 figures].
D. Gespard de Coligny - Rating 7.
  • 6 units of Gascon crossbowmen [24 figures each].
E. Yves  d’AlégreRating 7, Rash.
  • 3 units of French Gendarmes [16 figures each].
  • 1 units of Stradiots [16 figures].
F. Artillery Train - ostensibly under the C-in-C's command.
  • 2 heavy guns [1 gun model plus crew each].
  • 2 medium guns [1 gun model plus crew each].
Total - 380 Infantry; 144 Cavalry. 4 Guns.

Unit Characterisation Table for Cerignola 1503

CAVALRY UNITS
Unit
Unit Type
[move]
Melee
Dice #
Shooting
Dice #
Morale
save
Stamina
Special
French Gendarmes
Heavy Horse [12”]
10
-
4+
4
Elite: 4+ to rally disorder.
Valiant: Re-roll failed break test.
Heavy Cavalry Charge: add D3 melee result bonus.
Full harness: roll 2 extra morale save dice in melee.
French Argulets
Light Horse
[16”]
3
1
[12”]
5+
3
Cautious: may use free move to retire.
Crossbow: no close range
Evade: can evade
Spanish Knights
Heavy Horse [12”]
9
-
3+
4
Elite: 5+ to rally disorder.
Valiant: Re-roll failed break test.
Heavy Cavalry Charge: add D3 melee result bonus.
Full harness: roll 2 extra morale save dice in melee.
Spanish Genitors
Light Horse [12”]
5
1
[6”]
4+
3
Javelin: no close range.
Marauders: Do not count command distance.
Skirmish: Freely change formation; shoot at full effect.
Fire & Evade: can evade, or give closing fire & evade.
Lance Spezzate
Heavy Horse [12”]
9
-
5+
4
Heavy Cavalry Charge: add 1 melee result bonus.
Full harness: roll 2 extra morale save dice in melee.
Mounted Crossbows
Light Horse
[16”]
3
1
[12”]
5+
3
Cautious: may use free move to retire.
Crossbow: no close range.
Evade: can evade
Stradiots
Light Horse
[16”]
5
1
[6”]
4+
3
Brittle: quit if rally failed when shaken.
Javelin: no close range.
Marauders: Do not count command distance.
Skirmish: Freely change formation; shoot at full effect.
Fire & Evade: can evade, or give closing fire & evade.

ARTILLERY UNITS
Unit
Unit Type
[move]
Melee
Dice #
Shooting
Dice #
Morale
save
Stamina
Special
Light Artillery
Artillery
[4”, 8” limbered]
1
1 - 2 - 3
[32” - 16” – 6”]
5+
2

Medium Artillery
Artillery
[0”, 8” limbered]
1
1 - 2 - 3
[48” - 24” – 6”]
5+
2
May be ordered to turn on the spot.
Heavy Artillery
Artillery
[0”, 8” limbered]
1
1 - 2 - 3
[64” - 32” – 6”]
5+
2
May not move at all once unlimbered.

INFANTRY UNITS
Unit
Unit Type
[move]
Melee
Dice #
Shooting
Dice #
Morale
save
Stamina
Special
French Crossbows
Battle Line
[8”]
4
2
[12”]
5+
3
Brittle: quit if rally failed when shaken.
Crossbow: no close range.
Swiss Pike
Pike Block
[8”]
10
-
4+
8
Elite: 4+ (5+ post 1522) to rally disorder.
Valiant: re-roll failed break test.
Ferocious: re-roll misses when charging.
Bad War: melee break test +1 Vs Land’s / Swiss.
Hedgehog: no flanks / rear; shelter 1 shot; static only.
Swiss Arquebus
Battle Line
[8”]
4
2
[12”]
4+
3
Elite: 4+ (5+ post 1522) to rally disorder.
Hedgehog: shelter with associated pike; static only.
Pre-Bicocca Swiss
-
-
-
-
-
Add: Pre-Bicocca: Ignore shaken battalia rules until all Swiss pike & halberdiers / army is shaken or destroyed.
Spanish Colunela
Battle Line
[8”]
5
2
[12”]
4+
5
Pike company: cavalry count as pike armed.
Colunela: add D2 melee result bonus Vs infantry.
Volley Fire: add 1 dice to ‘closing fire’ shooting value.
Hedgehog: no flanks / rear; shelter integral shot; static.
Landsknecht Pike
Pike Block
[8”]
7
-
4+
5
Bad War: melee break test +1 Vs Land’s / Swiss.
Valiant: re-roll failed break test.
Hedgehog: no flanks / rear; shelter 1 shot; static only.
Landsknecht Arquebus
Battle Line
[8”]
2
1
[12”]
4+
3
Hedgehog: shelter with associated pike; static only.

Elite Landsknecht
v
v
v
v
v
Add: Elite: 5+ to rally disorder.
Italian Arquebus
Battle Line
[8”]
4
2
[12”]
5+
3
Hedgehog: shelter with associated pike; static only.
Italian Infantry
Battle Line
[8”]
5
-
5+
3
2 Handed Weapons: -1 to enemy saves.


Scenario Notes

Terrain

There are only three significant pieces of terrain. 
  • The walled town of Cerignola is impassable.
  • The slopes of the hill, on which the town stands, count as light rough terrain.
  • The ditch and earthwork. The ditch counts as a linear obstacle that takes one full move to cross. It will disorder all troops that enter or leave it on a result of 3+. Troops in the ditch can engage with troops behind the earthwork in melee counting it as a fortification that gives the defender a +1 to morale save modifier (for cover) and a +1 melee result modifier (for defending a minor fortification). The earthwork, if undefended, takes one full move to cross.
  • All other terrain is only aesthetic.
Command Ratings
  • Decisive: May re-roll a failed morale check, counting a subsequent check failure as a blunder roll.
  • Timid: Re-roll any order resulting in three moves.
  • Aggressive: Add one to command rating when ordering a charge.
  • Rash: As aggressive except that the commander will blunder on rolls of 11 or 12. The first blunder he makes will always be an advance (50% chance) or charge (50% chance).
Blunder Rolls
  • See Rash above.
  • If the French artillery blunders it will halt in place for the remainder of the battle and be unable to fire - it is delayed, runs out of ready powder, etc.
  • If a Spanish artillery piece rolls two or more ones when firing there is a powder explosion. The artillery piece is destroyed and all units within 3" take 1 stamina loss and become disordered. This can happen only once in the game.
Turn 1 & Other Timings.
  • On turn one: The trumpets have sounded the order for the French to advance. The French have blindly moved forward into their present positions in preparation to charge (Note: Louis d'Ars Gendarmes start the game within arquebus range of the Spanish earthworks). The Spanish start the game.
  • The French artillery is some still way from the battlefield, struggling up the road in the heat. It may not enter the field until turn 3.